Exploring the new DevOps – Azure Command Line Interface 2.0 (CLI)

Dev Tips


I’m a huge fan of the command line, and sometimes I feel like Windows people are missing out on the power of text mode. Fortunately, today Windows 10 has bash (via Ubuntu on Windows 10), PowerShell, and “classic” CMD. I use all three, myself.

Five years ago I started managing my Azure cloud web apps using the Azure CLI. I’ve been a huge fan of it ever since. It was written in node.js, it worked the same everywhere, and it got the job done.

Fast forward to today and the Azure team just announced a complete Azure CLI re-write, and now 2.0 is out, today. Initially I was concerned it had been re-written and didn’t understand the philosophy behind it. But I understand it now. While it works on Windows (my daily driver) it’s architecturally aligned with Mac and (mostly, IMHO) Linux users. It also supports new thinking around a modern command line with support for things like JMESPath, a query language for JSON. It works well and clearly with the usual suspects of course, like grep, jq, cut, etc. It’s easily installed with pip, or you just get Python 3.5.x and then just “pip install –user azure-cli.”

Linux people (feel free to check the script) can just do this curl, but it’s also in apt-get, of course.

curl -L https://aka.ms/InstallAzureCli | bash

NOTE: Since I already have the older Azure CLI 1.0 on my machine, it’s useful to note that these two CLIs can live on the same machine. The new one is “az” and the older is “azure,” so no problems there.

Or, for those of you who run individual Docker containers for your tools (or if you’re just wanting to explore) you can

docker run -v ${HOME}:/root -it azuresdk/azure-cli-python:<version>

Then I just “az login” and I’m off! Here I’ll query my subscriptions:

C:UsersscottDesktop>  az account list --output table
Name CloudName Sub State IsDefault
------------------------------------------- ----------- --- ------- -----------
3-Month Free Trial AzureCloud 0f3 Enabled
Pay-As-You-Go AzureCloud 34c Enabled
Windows Azure MSDN AzureCloud ffb Enabled True

At this point, it’s already feeling familiar. It’s “az noun verb” and there’s an optional –output parameter. If I don’t include –output by default I’ll get JSON…which I can then query with JMESPath if I’d like. (Those of us who are older may be having a little XML/XPath/XQuery déjà vu)

I can use JSON, TSV, tables, and even “colorized json” or JSONC.

C:UsersscottDesktop> az appservice plan list --output table   
AppServicePlanName GeoRegion Kind Location Status
-------------------- ---------------- ------ ---------------- --------
Default1 North Central US app North Central US Ready
Default1 Southeast Asia app Southeast Asia Ready
Default1 West Europe app West Europe Ready
DefaultServerFarm West US app West US Ready
myEchoHostingPlan North Central US app North Central US Ready

I can make and manage basically anything. Here I’ll make a new App Service Plan and put two web apps in it, all managed in a group:

az group create -n MyResourceGroup
# Create an Azure AppService that we can use to host multiple web apps 
az appservice plan create -n MyAppServicePlan -g MyResourceGroup

# Create two web apps within the appservice (note: name param must be a unique DNS entry)
az appservice web create -n MyWebApp43432 -g MyResourceGroup --plan MyAppServicePlan
az appservice web create -n MyWEbApp43433 -g MyResourceGroup --plan MyAppServicePlan

You might be thinking this looks like PowerShell. Why not use PowerShell? Remember this isn’t for Windows primarily. There’s a ton of DevOps happening in Python on Linux/Mac and this fits very nicely into that. For those of us (myself included) who are PowerShell fans, PowerShell has massive and complete Azure Support. Of course, while the bash folks will need to use JMESPath to simulate passing objects around, PowerShell can keep on keeping on. There’s a command line for everyone.

It’s easy to get started with the CLI at http://aka.ms/CLI and learn about the command line with docs and samples. Check out topics like installing and updating the CLI, working with Virtual Machines, creating a complete Linux environment including VMs, Scale Sets, Storage, and network, and deploying Azure Web Apps – and let them know what you think at azfeedback@microsoft.com. Also, as always, the Azure CLI 2.0 is open source and on GitHub.


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